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22/07/22

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22/07/22

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22/07/22

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22/07/22

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22/07/22

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21/07/22

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21/07/22

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Harris Academies
All Academies in our Federation aim to transform the lives of the students they serve by bringing about rapid improvement in examination results, personal development and aspiration.

Central Office

Bexley

Bromley

Clapham

Croydon

Greenwich

Haringey

Havering

Merton

Newham

Southwark

Sutton

Thurrock

Wandsworth

Westminster

Design and Technology

                                Design and Technology Curriculum

 

“Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.”

Steve Jobs

What is the intention of the KS1 and KS2 Design and Technology Curriculum?

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

We are very aware of living in a technological age and therefore aim to present our pupils, from a very early age, with problem-solving activities utilising their natural creativity. We follow the process of planning, designing, building, testing and evaluating so that learning derives equally from all outcomes. We work with a wide range of materials commonly found in our daily lives and encourage our pupils to make their own choices about which are best suited for a task.

The National Curriculum for Design and Technology aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • Develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world
  • Build and apply a repertoire of knowledge, understanding and skills in order to design and make high-quality prototypes and products for a wide range of users
  • Critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others
  • Understand and apply the principles of nutrition and learn how to cook.
How will this be implemented?

Our federation uses the National Curriculum in England 2014 framework for Design and Technology as the basis for its curriculum planning. We develop our medium term plans using a range of sources, including commercial on-line resources available from the National Stem Centre and other curriculum providers. While there are opportunities for pupils of all abilities to develop their skills and knowledge in each teaching unit, the planned progression built into the Design and Technology curriculum means that the pupils are increasingly challenged as they move through the academy. Design and Technology is taught by individual class teachers who take responsibility for planning, resourcing and delivering this area of the curriculum. Overall responsibility for ensuring that there is a suitable risk assessment in place for this subject lies with the subject coordinator who will ensure that this has been reviewed by the Principal.

In the Harris Federation, we make Design and Technology an enjoyable learning experience. Pupils undertake a Design and Technology project at least three times a year. Lessons take place weekly as tis

ensures that knowledge can be hierarchically built upon both within a year group and across the whole academy.

Each Academy uses a variety of teaching and learning styles in Design and Technology lessons. The principle aim is to develop pupil’s knowledge, skills and understanding in this area. Teachers ensure that the pupils apply their knowledge and understanding when developing ideas, planning and making products and then evaluating them. We do this through a mixture of whole-class teaching and individual/group activities. Within lessons, we give pupils the opportunity both to work on their own and to collaborate with others, listening to other pupil’s ideas and treating these with respect. Pupils critically evaluate existing products, their own work and that of others. They have the opportunity to use a wide range of materials and resources, including ICT.

The learning opportunities can be divided into three main areas.

Investigative, Disassembly and Evaluative Activities (IDEAs)

These activities provide opportunities for the pupils to explore existing products and to gain skills, knowledge and understanding which can be applied in a design and make assignment.

Focused Practical Tasks (FPTs)

Focused practical tasks provide opportunities to learn and practice particular skills and knowledge.

Design and Make Assignments (DMAs)

A design and make assignment provides an opportunity for the pupils to combine their skills, knowledge and understanding to develop products that meet a perceived need, for example a shield for a warrior. (In general DMAs in Key Stage One will tend to be shorter in duration and, as pupils move towards the end of Key Stage Two, their designing and making will become more complex and therefore more time consuming.)

Early Years Foundation Stage

We teach Design and Technology in our Nursery and Reception classes as an integral part of the topic work covered during the year and as set out in the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework which underpin the curriculum planning for children aged three to five. We encourage the development of skills, knowledge and understanding that help pupils make sense of their world as an integral part of the academy’s work. This learning forms the foundations for later work in Design and Technology. These early experiences include asking questions about how things work, investigating and using a variety of construction kits, materials, tools and products, developing making skills and handling appropriate tools and construction material safely and with increasing control. We provide a range of experiences that encourage exploration, observation, problem solving, critical thinking and discussion.

These activities, indoors and outdoors, attract the pupil’s interest and curiosity.

The national curriculum states that in:

Key Stage 1

Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, for example, the home and academy, gardens and playgrounds, the local community, industry and the wider environment.

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make

  • Select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing.
  • Select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate

  • Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.
  • Technical knowledge
  • Build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.
  • Explore and use mechanisms, for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles, in their products.
  • Key Stage 2

    Through a variety of creative and practical activities, pupils should be taught the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to engage in an iterative process of designing and making. They should work in a range of relevant contexts, for example, the home, school, leisure, culture, enterprise, industry and the wider environment.

    When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

    Design

  • Use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.
  • Make

  • Select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks, for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing, accurately.
  • Select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.
  • Evaluate

  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • Understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.
  • Technical Knowledge

  • Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • Understand and use mechanical systems in their products, for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages.
  • Understand and use electrical systems in their products, for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors.
  • Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.
  • Cooking and Nutrition

    As part of their work with food, pupils should be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating.

    Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life.

    Pupils should be taught to:

    Key Stage 1

  • Use the basic principles of a healthy and varied diet to prepare dishes
  • Understand where food comes from.

Key Stage 2

  • Understand and apply the principles of a healthy and varied diet
  • Prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking techniques
  • Understand seasonality, and know where and how a variety of ingredients are grown, reared, caught and processed.

 

 

As a federation we have decided on the end of key stage outcomes that we want our pupils to know as the part of the content of our design and technology curriculum. We have allowed flexibility for it to be covered and revisited over a two year period to support pupils in gaining a deeper understanding of this knowledge.

See Appendix for the ‘end of key stage milestones’ we have laid out for KS1, lower KS2 and

upper KS2 to cover.

How will we judge the impact of the design and technology curriculum?

The design and technology curriculum will make a profound and positive impact on the outcomes of every pupil. The structure enables us to return to core knowledge and skills throughout the course, imbedding key practises and understanding

Core knowledge of each unit is supported by a knowledge organiser which details the key learning points, vocabulary and key questions. This is sent home in advance of the unit, allowing pupils to make a head start on their learning. It is our expectation that the knowledge on our organiser is known by all.

We endeavour to create strong and appropriate links with other subjects to enhance the curriculum and learning experience, predominantly but not exclusively with maths, literacy, music, PSHE, geography, history and PE.

Our teachers rely on a range of assessment tools to provide data on the knowledge and skills pupils have, their progress and their development points.

This includes:

  • assessment for learning
  • challenge tasks
  • enquiry tasks
  • standards of learning in books and products
  • quizzing, multiple choice and end of unit questions
  • pupil voice

APPENDIX

End of Key Stage Milestones: Design and Technology

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